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    How Much Should You Ride an Older Horse?


    Many people wonder what workload an older horse can keep. Can you drive as you always have? Should I give him a less rigorous workload or should I ride an older horse? Most likely, unless your horse is very fragile and old, your horse will regularly benefit from light work.


     

    Exercise With Your Senior Horse

    Regular light exercise will help your horse stay healthy. Your horse may not be as agile or flexible as in his youth, so keep that in mind. However, a horse that has worked all his life may not benefit from becoming a full-fledged potato. It is possible that sliding stops, walks or daytime jumps must pass on the side of the road, but regular driving with light can be beneficial. As with older people, exercise can help keep muscles strong and joints flexible. The activity benefits even your digestive system since a little light exercise can help maintain intestinal motility.


    Many people can only ride our horses on weekends, but it is likely that your senior horse will walk better several times a week, instead of just a long, hard walk on Sunday afternoon. It may be time for a performance horse to become a child horse that carries a lighter load several times a week.


    Maybe a senior rider who just wants a quiet trick is a good option for a horse that is about to retire. Of course, some horses do not know they are older and behave like two-year-old idiots. Therefore, the type of semi-retirement adapted to a given horse should be based on their abilities. More often, light work is beneficial to the body and spirit of the horse.


    If you are working with your older horse a little longer or harder than expected, remember that recovery may take a little longer. Your muscles do not recover from fatigue as quickly as before. If your horse has arthritis in one of its joints, hard work can make it feel more uncomfortable. Plan to give your horse some rest days after a long or difficult trip.

    Medication for Your Senior Horse


    It is possible to administer painkillers to your horse, if the joints are painful, but talk to your veterinarian and think carefully about the possible side effects of taking medications. Some medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can have adverse effects on a horse's stomach and cause equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS). The fact that your horse shows no pain once with the medication does not mean that it can be put back into full service.


    It is possible to administer painkillers to your horse, if the joints are painful, but talk to your veterinarian and think carefully about the possible side effects of taking medications. Some medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can have adverse effects on a horse's stomach and cause equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS). The fact that your horse shows no pain once with the medication does not mean that it can be put back into full service.


    If your horse becomes arthritic or inadequate, it may be time to withdraw completely. Of course, the fact that your horse is no longer working does not mean you can skimp on care. The best exercise at this time is a good herb with good grass or hay, easily digested concentrates, and a tolerant foot. A large area where you have to walk to find your water, food, and shelter is ideal because it allows you to do a gentle exercise that you can do yourself. Keep providing the best basic care and give your retired horse the golden years it deserves.




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